Sunday, October 24, 2010

Batten Robomaru

Batten Robomaru, Popy, Japan,
1970s
Another cute robot from Japan, this one is a storage box for little rubber figurines. He goes well alongside Robocon and his friends.


The back is full of rubber figurines of the
characters of the show !

Thursday, October 14, 2010

Casimir

In need of a friendly monster ? Say hello to Casimir, the hero of a kid's show in the late 70ies in France called l'île aux Enfants. He was a friendly monster that loved to cook and eat gloubi glouba (don't ask what that is to your French cook !)



Group of Casimir toys, France
Casimir, Delacoste, France
1970s


Monday, October 11, 2010

Astrosmurf, Schleich, Portugal
1969

And now, a little blue note to my compatriot Peyo who opened the "BD" world to my son (together with Hergé, of course...)

Cosmoschtroumpf, Orli Jouet, France
1983









Sunday, October 10, 2010

Thunderbirds

5,4,3,2,1,... Thunderbirds are Go ! When color made its debut on British television, kids shows finally were packed with adventures and out-of the world vehicles. The secret ? Puppets. Gerry Anderson had a try at it in previous shows like Fireball XL-5 or Stingray, but it would be his Thunderbirds show that would make the world wake to a new type of Sci-Fi design. Shows became instant hits in Japan, the Netherlands, and the USA. An incredible number of special effects and modelers were called to the rescue, some of them working on James Bond movies later on.

Motorized Thunderbird 2 kit, maker unknown
1960s
The storyboard, that of a family that was involved in the most dazling rescue operations but always trying to keep their identities secret, was thrilling at every episode. And when the kids saw the magic lines "filmed in Supermarionation" on the screen filled with explosions of every kind, they knew they had one of the best Sci-Fi on TV.



FAB 1, JR21 toy, United Kingdom,
1960s

Thursday, October 7, 2010

Tetsujin 28




Tetsujin 28 and Monster robot, Nostalgic Heroes, Japan,
1990s
This pot-belly robot was quite popular in the States - Tetsujin 28 aka Gigantor. He is your robot version of Japan's Sumo warriors. In the cartoon, Tetsujin is a robot with incredible strength, but no intelligence whatsoever. He is remote controlled by a young boy, Jimmy Sparks. In Japan - original tin toys of this character were made in great numbers. These vinyl repros have their charm also.